Home, Relocated

Home, Relocated

Wondering where the food has gone? Wondering why the past month or so has been me posting pictures of art exhibits and getting all vague about new super secret projects? The answer (dear readers!) is that I’ve been distracted. The project — which is not actually all that super secret — has been a house hunt. And as of Friday, it succeeded. We just bought a house!

We’ve been in Philly seven years now, and coming into 2015, we talked it over and decided it was time to really settle. So after a lot of looking and planning — and a little bit of yelling — we’ve jettisoned the renter’s life and we’re moving about ten minutes up the road.

Olympus 12mm at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Olympus 12mm at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

This is (alas!) not food. Food will definitely make its return to this here cooking blog. But in the meantime, I spent yesterday afternoon at the Philadelphia Museum of Art with a new (to me) camera lens — an Olympus 12mm f/2.0 — and I thought I’d share a few pictures.

I bought the lens for another project, and I haven’t really had time to use it very much for the past couple of weeks. So the museum — with its well-illuminated interiors and well-considered design — seemed like a perfect opportunity. And the Olympus 12mm didn’t disappoint.

Pickling Without Pasteur, June 2015 Edition

Want to get your fermentation on, but don’t want to do it alone?  No problem!  If you’re here in Philadelphia, come on down to the Unitarian Society of Germantown‘s kitchen for the June 2015 Edition of my workshop: Pickling Without Pasteur.

Pickling Without Pasteur, June 2015 Edition
The Spring MALT catalog just arrived, and I’m pretty excited!

That’s right.  The always fabulous Mount Airy Learning Tree decided that they want me back.  The workshop is Saturday, June 13 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 noon.  The cost is $29.00, plus a $10 materials fee.  And I want to see you all there, elbow-deep in cabbage and brine!

You can click here to sign up right now.  Don’t wait!

Tuna-Celeriac Fish Cakes

Tuna-Celeriac Fish Cakes

Apparently, I’m still on a root vegetable kick. Or perhaps it’s more accurate to say that I am still feeling overwhelmed by my winter CSA. My kitchen is currently filled with potatoes, sweet and ordinary. It’s filled with turnips and rutabaga. It’s filled with carrots, parsnips, and radishes. And this past week brought us two particularly knobby, particularly ugly celeriacs.

I say that the celeriacs are knobby and ugly, but here’s the thing: I actually kind of love them. For a long time, I only knew how to do the one thing with them, and that was salad. The classic French preparation for celeriac is to cut it into slivery matchsticks, arrange the matchsticks over a bed of lettuce, and dress the whole thing with a remoulade sauce. It’s delicious. But there’s only so much mayonnaise-based dressing you want in your life. It’s — let’s say — a definite sometimes food.

Biscuit-Topped Pork Pot Pie

Biscuit-Topped Pork Pot Pie

There’s two things that I’ve been thinking about for the past little while. The Odyssey and winter cold. The reason for the latter should be pretty obvious at this point. But the reason for the former — not so much.

For the past little while, I’ve been teaching The Odyssey in one of my classes. We’ve gone through the crazy islands. We’ve talked about gender dynamics, gift economies, and the importance of hospitality in a culture that predates hotels by several millenia. And on that last point — on hospitality — I’ve told my students that the dude to look out for is Eumaeus.

Gluten-Free Quiche with Potato Crust

Gluten-Free Quiche with Potato Crust

Gluten-free cooking is a particularly interesting challenge for me. I don’t know how far you all have read back in Twice Cooked, but if you know anything about me and my relationship to food, you’ll know that I’m a little like bread flour: I form strong gluten bonds. I can be pretty judgmental toward folks for whom gluten-free eating is a diet fad. And I am given to rant, if folks will let me, about the con-artist industry that has grown up around selling vulnerable people expensive bread substitutes by playing on their fears about industrial agriculture’s handling of wheat.

Bread, it seems to me, is one of our oldest, most enduring signifiers of civilization. And there is a way in which gluten-free diets are about undermining bread not just as a food, but as a thing that encapsulates the bonds of community that hold us together in relative peace.

Keurig 2.0’s DRM Broken With a Piece of Tape

Last year around this time, I made a post about how Green Mountain Coffee — the folks who make those wasteful Keurig single-cup coffee brewers — would be adding a digital rights management (DRM) scheme to their product to keep consumers from using third-party, unauthorized pods. They claimed that it was all about quality control and safety. And that, as TechDirt reported at the time, it would add interactive-enabled benefits (whatever that means).

In reality, the issue seems to have been that their overpriced pods weren’t selling as well as those of competitors, and they wanted a way to keep other companies from stealing the goodies from their playground.

Curried Sweet Potato Pancakes

Curried Sweet Potato Pancakes

Root vegetable pancakes are a great tool to have in your arsenal of winter cooking tricks. If you’re like me and you try to eat seasonally, there will undoubtedly come a point where you’ll look at box after box of turnips and parsnips and yams, and you’ll be all like: what on Earth am I going to do with these that I didn’t do last night, or last week, or last year?!

Don’t get me wrong. I like winter vegetables. But especially when we’re crunched for time, there’s a kind of monotony to the root vegetable rigmarole: roasted, or pureed, or turned into soup. Again and again and again.